industry

HT20: DECAY

This Spring, Industry has retreated for a moment...We have decided to return to our roots to produce an all-visual issue: pure clickhole - no cogitation required. We want to give you some time to replenish yourself, prepare yourself for the times ahead. The history of 'scandal' is a long one, and it is a concept perhaps more at home in a Victorian bodice-ripper than in the information age. Now, not only is it questionable whether anything really shocks us anymore, but the notion of word-of-mouth is pretty much obsolete.


News of scandal is instantly proliferated all over the web, from that girl who ate her own tampon to Trump's election win. The speed at which scandals are normalised, too, converted into memes almost immediately, raises questions of how things once met with moral and political outrage are so easily subsumed into popular culture. Does this trivialisation of figures such as Trump serve to truly undermine their power, or does it rather gradually bury the shock and anxiety - what our contributor Rordgio_della calls the 'ethical scandal' - of his election and its consequences under layers of irony? Scandal has also become an aesthetic in itself. This fascination with the new breed of 'fallen woman', epitomised in the 'iconic' public breakdowns of Britney Spears, Amanda Bynes et al have become cornerstones of contemporary y2k culture. It is said that we are always most attracted to the era just before we were born, but just what is it about seeing childhood favourites defamed that millennials - Depop sellers and aesthetic blogs alike - just love? Maybe we see a reflection of our own growing-up in the transition of Disney stars to Spring Breakers. One couldn't help but wonder how the next generation will view the tragic fallen heroes of the Now - is Miley Cyrus' purp-and-twerking phase even redeemable? Will Katy Perry's Carey-from-Suite-Life haircut one day be reblogged with nostalgic glee? The fact Paris Hilton's mugshot and Lindsay Lohan's coked-up paparazzi shots have become recognisable emblems of visual culture as the manufactured pictures of the stars of yore - of Marilyn and Elvis - perhaps sheds light on what we love so much about scandal culture. These pictures show base reality - law enforcement etc - infringing on the shimmering, hyperreal world of celebrity, it pulls the remote symbols, the flickering TV images, which superstars are to us closer to our world. Yet at the same time, these images are instantly reified back into something unattainable, even miraculous. What's not to love? XOXO Kirsty + Mia





HT19: RITUAL

This Spring, Industry has retreated for a moment...We have decided to return to our roots to produce an all-visual issue: pure clickhole - no cogitation required. We want to give you some time to replenish yourself, prepare yourself for the times ahead. The history of 'scandal' is a long one, and it is a concept perhaps more at home in a Victorian bodice-ripper than in the information age. Now, not only is it questionable whether anything really shocks us anymore, but the notion of word-of-mouth is pretty much obsolete.


News of scandal is instantly proliferated all over the web, from that girl who ate her own tampon to Trump's election win. The speed at which scandals are normalised, too, converted into memes almost immediately, raises questions of how things once met with moral and political outrage are so easily subsumed into popular culture. Does this trivialisation of figures such as Trump serve to truly undermine their power, or does it rather gradually bury the shock and anxiety - what our contributor Rordgio_della calls the 'ethical scandal' - of his election and its consequences under layers of irony? Scandal has also become an aesthetic in itself. This fascination with the new breed of 'fallen woman', epitomised in the 'iconic' public breakdowns of Britney Spears, Amanda Bynes et al have become cornerstones of contemporary y2k culture. It is said that we are always most attracted to the era just before we were born, but just what is it about seeing childhood favourites defamed that millennials - Depop sellers and aesthetic blogs alike - just love? Maybe we see a reflection of our own growing-up in the transition of Disney stars to Spring Breakers. One couldn't help but wonder how the next generation will view the tragic fallen heroes of the Now - is Miley Cyrus' purp-and-twerking phase even redeemable? Will Katy Perry's Carey-from-Suite-Life haircut one day be reblogged with nostalgic glee? The fact Paris Hilton's mugshot and Lindsay Lohan's coked-up paparazzi shots have become recognisable emblems of visual culture as the manufactured pictures of the stars of yore - of Marilyn and Elvis - perhaps sheds light on what we love so much about scandal culture. These pictures show base reality - law enforcement etc - infringing on the shimmering, hyperreal world of celebrity, it pulls the remote symbols, the flickering TV images, which superstars are to us closer to our world. Yet at the same time, these images are instantly reified back into something unattainable, even miraculous. What's not to love? XOXO Kirsty + Mia





industry

MT19: METAMORPHOSIS

Welcome back to a new year with Industry! ​We’ve spent Michaelmas getting things organised, and are finally ready to kick things off with our first online content update. Our theme for this month is Metamorphosis, a concept that has been explored in and out by creatives and thinkers through time.


Metamorphosis is about transformation, both literal and metaphysical. It is about mutation, modification, reconstruction, and rebirth. Questions surface about the human body’s relationship to other physical entities, and about personal and external processes of growth. Over the Christmas Vac, our team has been hard at work putting together an array of poems, writing, and art that look at Metamorphosis from a number of different angles. From magical comics and ephemeral drawings, to poems that interpret Metamorphosis through the lenses of mysticism. In photographs and prints, nature meets AI, and monotone abstractions meet colourful experiments. The works that have arisen from this theme are at times personal and introspective, and at times abject and disturbing. They are a representation of the spectrum of talent on this year’s team- and we couldn’t be more proud to share them with you.As a yearly publication, each magazine we put out has its own recognisable aesthetic - unique to the team who produced it. With this month’s online theme, we wanted to set the scene for how Industry 19’ is ready to transform and grow to be bigger and better than ever before. Stick with us for the journey towards our next Annual, we can’t wait to share everything we’ve got in store along the way! BIG INDUSTRY LOVE Audrey and Zoe xx





HT18: SCANDAL

This Spring, Industry has retreated for a moment...We have decided to return to our roots to produce an all-visual issue: pure clickhole - no cogitation required. We want to give you some time to replenish yourself, prepare yourself for the times ahead. The history of 'scandal' is a long one, and it is a concept perhaps more at home in a Victorian bodice-ripper than in the information age. Now, not only is it questionable whether anything really shocks us anymore, but the notion of word-of-mouth is pretty much obsolete.


News of scandal is instantly proliferated all over the web, from that girl who ate her own tampon to Trump's election win. The speed at which scandals are normalised, too, converted into memes almost immediately, raises questions of how things once met with moral and political outrage are so easily subsumed into popular culture. Does this trivialisation of figures such as Trump serve to truly undermine their power, or does it rather gradually bury the shock and anxiety - what our contributor Rordgio_della calls the 'ethical scandal' - of his election and its consequences under layers of irony? Scandal has also become an aesthetic in itself. This fascination with the new breed of 'fallen woman', epitomised in the 'iconic' public breakdowns of Britney Spears, Amanda Bynes et al have become cornerstones of contemporary y2k culture. It is said that we are always most attracted to the era just before we were born, but just what is it about seeing childhood favourites defamed that millennials - Depop sellers and aesthetic blogs alike - just love? Maybe we see a reflection of our own growing-up in the transition of Disney stars to Spring Breakers. One couldn't help but wonder how the next generation will view the tragic fallen heroes of the Now - is Miley Cyrus' purp-and-twerking phase even redeemable? Will Katy Perry's Carey-from-Suite-Life haircut one day be reblogged with nostalgic glee? The fact Paris Hilton's mugshot and Lindsay Lohan's coked-up paparazzi shots have become recognisable emblems of visual culture as the manufactured pictures of the stars of yore - of Marilyn and Elvis - perhaps sheds light on what we love so much about scandal culture. These pictures show base reality - law enforcement etc - infringing on the shimmering, hyperreal world of celebrity, it pulls the remote symbols, the flickering TV images, which superstars are to us closer to our world. Yet at the same time, these images are instantly reified back into something unattainable, even miraculous. What's not to love? XOXO Kirsty + Mia





HT18: FOOD

Welcome back to a new year with Industry! ​We’ve spent Michaelmas getting things organised, and are finally ready to kick things off with our first online content update. Our theme for this month is Metamorphosis, a concept that has been explored in and out by creatives and thinkers through time.


Metamorphosis is about transformation, both literal and metaphysical. It is about mutation, modification, reconstruction, and rebirth. Questions surface about the human body’s relationship to other physical entities, and about personal and external processes of growth. Over the Christmas Vac, our team has been hard at work putting together an array of poems, writing, and art that look at Metamorphosis from a number of different angles. From magical comics and ephemeral drawings, to poems that interpret Metamorphosis through the lenses of mysticism. In photographs and prints, nature meets AI, and monotone abstractions meet colourful experiments. The works that have arisen from this theme are at times personal and introspective, and at times abject and disturbing. They are a representation of the spectrum of talent on this year’s team- and we couldn’t be more proud to share them with you.As a yearly publication, each magazine we put out has its own recognisable aesthetic - unique to the team who produced it. With this month’s online theme, we wanted to set the scene for how Industry 19’ is ready to transform and grow to be bigger and better than ever before. Stick with us for the journey towards our next Annual, we can’t wait to share everything we’ve got in store along the way! BIG INDUSTRY LOVE Audrey and Zoe xx





HT17: THE MACHINE

This Spring, Industry has retreated for a moment...We have decided to return to our roots to produce an all-visual issue: pure clickhole - no cogitation required. We want to give you some time to replenish yourself, prepare yourself for the times ahead. The history of 'scandal' is a long one, and it is a concept perhaps more at home in a Victorian bodice-ripper than in the information age. Now, not only is it questionable whether anything really shocks us anymore, but the notion of word-of-mouth is pretty much obsolete.


News of scandal is instantly proliferated all over the web, from that girl who ate her own tampon to Trump's election win. The speed at which scandals are normalised, too, converted into memes almost immediately, raises questions of how things once met with moral and political outrage are so easily subsumed into popular culture. Does this trivialisation of figures such as Trump serve to truly undermine their power, or does it rather gradually bury the shock and anxiety - what our contributor Rordgio_della calls the 'ethical scandal' - of his election and its consequences under layers of irony? Scandal has also become an aesthetic in itself. This fascination with the new breed of 'fallen woman', epitomised in the 'iconic' public breakdowns of Britney Spears, Amanda Bynes et al have become cornerstones of contemporary y2k culture. It is said that we are always most attracted to the era just before we were born, but just what is it about seeing childhood favourites defamed that millennials - Depop sellers and aesthetic blogs alike - just love? Maybe we see a reflection of our own growing-up in the transition of Disney stars to Spring Breakers. One couldn't help but wonder how the next generation will view the tragic fallen heroes of the Now - is Miley Cyrus' purp-and-twerking phase even redeemable? Will Katy Perry's Carey-from-Suite-Life haircut one day be reblogged with nostalgic glee? The fact Paris Hilton's mugshot and Lindsay Lohan's coked-up paparazzi shots have become recognisable emblems of visual culture as the manufactured pictures of the stars of yore - of Marilyn and Elvis - perhaps sheds light on what we love so much about scandal culture. These pictures show base reality - law enforcement etc - infringing on the shimmering, hyperreal world of celebrity, it pulls the remote symbols, the flickering TV images, which superstars are to us closer to our world. Yet at the same time, these images are instantly reified back into something unattainable, even miraculous. What's not to love? XOXO Kirsty + Mia





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